Writing Prompts: 50 Creative Writing Prompts Ideas to Try Out

writing prompts

The writing prompts examples below ask young writers to think through imagined or actual events, wacky scenarios, emotions, and the likes. Do try out the ones you believe would resonate most with your students or you.

But before we push further into this, I’ll like to give a short story. In my school days, I had a teacher who thought us the mechanics of writing that’s writing random stuff to actually writing prompts; she would scribble down on the whiteboard.

I believe it was every Monday…hmm, or Tuesday; however, it was one of these days, we would spend the first fifteen minutes of class writing about spaceships, fairies, ghosts, and all.

I stopped using writing prompts after my 5th Grade in my English class, which had to change when I began writing over a thousand words per day. Some days I had no idea what to write about, while other days, I already had a topic in hand but tried seeking the right words to place on paper.

Nonetheless, writing prompts have been an excellent tool to help me defeat that writer’s block and swiftly write like a pro.

What is a Writing Prompt?

A writing prompt is simply a brief passage of text or an image that provides a potential topic idea or starting point for the story, original essay, journal entry, report, etc.

Also, read Top 10 Most Unique Literary Elements of a Story

When it comes to writing prompts, they’re commonly used in essay portions of standardized tests and are also created by writers themselves.

What are the three parts of Writing Prompts?

1. We have the parts of the essay; yes, with prompts, you can break a more significant part of an assignment, like an essay, into smaller, more achievable pieces, which can be just what your students need to get the word flowing pretty good. These activities focus on applying writing prompts to form specific pieces of a given essay rather than just writing them to write a complete response.

2. One of the essential pieces of an essay, if not the most significant piece, is the thesis statement. The thesis statement is known to keep the focus on the essay, communicates the author’s intention, and determines what type of support a writer will use in their piece. Yes, you can use writing prompts to know how to write a thesis statement with ease.

Also, read How to Write Introduction of an Article (Tips and Examples)

3. Once you’re done with the thesis, next up is to determine the evidence you’ll use to support your point. And that evidence would compose the body of the essay. For instance, you’re a teacher. You provide your students with a thesis statement for an example writing prompt. They’ll use that thesis to write supporting sentences that might be used in the essay’s whole body of paragraphs.

What is a Writing Prompt in an Essay?

A writing prompt consists of 1-3 sentences, which raises an issue, or asks a question that you’ll have to respond to in a given essay. A teacher gives out most prompts as part of a timed exam or as essay prompts for an assignment.

The Four types of Essay in which Writing Prompts are included;

  1. Descriptive Essays
  2. Argumentative Essays
  3. Expository Essays
  4. Narrative Essays

Now, how do we write effective Essay Prompts?

To begin with, in response to the writing prompts, write a thesis statement (as succinctly described in the preceding) and list critical support on a piece of scrap paper. Make sure to write your response, include your thesis statement and provide all of the critical support in a well-organized paragraph with topic sentences. Make sure to review your writing.

Also, read Setting of a Story: Tips for Choosing a Setting and Examples

What makes a Good Writing Prompt Example?

  1. It would help if you launched somewhere; make sure you write about the experience.
  2. What might be happening here? Make sure you place that too.
  3. Randomly point to a place on a map. Why do you want to go there? And why not?
  4. What’s in a white cloud in the sky? What are the things there? Write about it.

How do I make my Ideas when Writing a Prompt?

  1. Think about that one life-changing lesson, something you learned in life and are willing to share with people.
  2. Think about the thing you know how to do best. What are you an expert in?
  3. What is the life story of that one person that’s important to you?
  4. What is the one thing that makes you either dissatisfied or angry?
  5. What are the life hacks you’re willing to share?
  6. What are the things you’ve avoided yourself and would want to share with other people? People would love to know, you know? J
  7. The one stuff you wish to tell people, perhaps on how to find stuff that is pretty hard to get in the store and all.
  8. Tell them how to outgrow something, perhaps a lousy characteristic we all share.
  9. How to become something.
  10. The power of stuff or something.
  11. Write a writing prompt on how to choose the best of things.
  12. How to navigate some dramatic change?
  13. Basic Travel topics.
  14. Write a writing prompt on why people get scared.
  15. The one creative stuff you have in your mind and would love to share with the world.
  16. Your one embarrassing mistake.
  17. All of the home improvement stuff you know and would love to share.
  18. What is the one book that has inspired you?
  19. The one crazy stuff you do that no one knows.
  20. The gazillions of jokes you have in your head.
  21. A book of letters or personal essays.

Also, read Book Publishing Made Easy: Follow These Simple Steps to Publish a Book

50 example writing Prompts ideas to try out;

writing prompts

  1. What causes racism?
  2. What’s the worst thing about the internet?
  3. Would you either be very strong or very handsome? Please, explain.
  4. What would your friends say is your worst quality?
  5. What ideas do you feed your brain with?
  6. Turn one of the last texts you sent into a story.
  7. Two friends have an agreement.
  8. Write about the first time you kissed someone on the lips.
  9. Write about the first time you traveled out.
  10. Write about your first big task.
  11. Write about the reasons you see.
  12. Six years from now. I will be where?
  13. Write about that fun holiday.
  14. Write about the two best football clubs in Europe.
  15. What are you grateful for?
  16. If you could do one thing at work, what would that be?
  17. Describe the temperament of your grandparents.
  18. Write about the time you had tremendous success.
  19. Why does it snow on the peak of mountains?
  20. Write about the time you felt uncomfortable around someone.
  21. He tried to fight the burglar, but he was no match.
  22. An island rose from the sea.
  23. The princess saved the hero.
  24. The whales once had feet.
  25. The whales were once land animals.
  26. The doorknob is broken.
  27. Can you fix me dinner?
  28. He had the perfect party planned only to have it ruined by his ex.
  29. She planned out this day for years.
  30. You are cured of the disease.
  31. Write a story about a character who’s trying to fill a space literally and metaphorically.
  32. Start or end your story with a black hole taking it.
  33. Write a story about your voyage outside earth.
  34. Write a story on how it feels to be an astronaut.
  35. Write a story about the sphinx of Egypt.
  36. Write a story about a young man who seeks love.
  37. Write a story about the events in Pompeii.
  38. Write your story from the perspective of a side character.
  39. Write about an extrovert and an introvert who are best of friends.
  40. Write a description of that one annoying person around your neighborhood.
  41. Start your story by describing your pet.
  42. Write about a character who is said to be the cure to all of humanity’s illnesses.
  43. Write a story about the extraction of the cure to all diseases from a man’s blood.
  44. Start your story with a metaphor about the human behavior
  45. What is your earliest memory?
  46. What would you like to be like if you were your pet?
  47. What would life be like if you were your favorite animal?
  48. If an alien abducted you, what would you do?
  49. Imagine you lived in a spaceship.
  50. Why did the scientists exclude Pluto as a planet?

Also, read 6 Most Effective Ways of Writing the Outline of an Article

Conclusion

When you or your student are done with an entry, do read or ask your students to read the work, or you can exchange it with a friend for a read around and send the necessary feedback to each other.

One thing you need to know is, writing prompts are used to help writers begin writing. They are known to provide the needed inspiration for a story, poem, and the likes. And you can sufficiently fight that dreaded writer’s block with no hassles of any kind!

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About the Author: Neville Goddard

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